(Update) Teaching Kindergartens in Thailand

In less than two weeks Dr. Warong’s pilot project of teaching the kindergarten will kick off. The pressure is piling up. I am beginning to feel nervous and nauseated. Will this work out? Will it yield an expected result? What if not?
 
Exactly on the first of November, the class will start. Two groups of students will be the subject, one hour each. Two teachers including myself are also involved. 
 
A few days before the end of this month, I’ll be getting a call. It will be from Dr. Warong and friends. He said he would like me and Ajarn Lloyd to be at the meeting with people involved in the project. If time permits, former Finance Minister Khun Korn will be present. Possibly, even Democrat Leader and former Prime Minister of Thailand Abhisit Vejjajiva will be there as well. If they cannot make it at the meeting, they will be present during the first few weeks of the project to observe.
 
Dr. Warong is really serious to build a strong foundation in Thailand when it comes to English. He doesn’t have problems in other fields like engineering, medicine, etc. However, when it comes to language such as English, Thailand is trailing behind other ASEAN countries. He wants to move English from a foreign language to a second language in a few years. He wants to change the current trend. And with the advent of ASEAN and the stiff global competition for work, things including communication and language competitiveness gives someone an edge over the others.   
 
For years the government gives a rather more focus to university students. Since they are the ones who will be working in different fields when they graduate, they are being prioritized. If you noticed, however, some graduates can’t make a rather understandable sentence. They may be good in Thailand, but they won’t make a difference if they work abroad, Dr. Warong said.
 
There is more to his plan than just the language. Ethics and protecting ones’ rights are also on the list. He has quite a long list, actually. But I can’t spill all the beans just yet. I’ll let him do it when he’s ready. Above all though, he believes everything should start at the early stage of education.
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18 Replies to “(Update) Teaching Kindergartens in Thailand”

  1. I haven't been in Thailand but hopefully next year, I can pay a visit. But from the stories of my friends who has been there for their holidays, it is indeed one of the problems of the people… they find it hard to communicate using English. It's good that there are actions now to resolve that.

  2. I have a niece studying in an elementary school there in Bangkok and they have nothing but praise for it. (And they came from Singapore before that!) – Fred

  3. I find that if Thai can only speak better English, they can be really competitive with others in the world in terms of the global workforce. Moving English as a second language will be a critical and great move.

  4. The younger you are, the better is your grasp of learning another language. Learning English has an advantage especially that the world is becoming a smaller place. However, I also believe in preserving one's culture. I hope that while learning another language, these kids won't forget their native tongue. -katrina centeno

  5. Sounds like an amazing initiative and English is a global language without which it becomes difficult to survive in this globalized world. All the best! 🙂

  6. I always think being a teacher is really a difficult job ! Especially kindergarten… Imagine those kids running around and you have to keep shouting on them. Meanwhile there is a kid crying. OMG~~~~ Respect to you!

  7. Could tell you are really passionate about this! Research has always supported that a language is easier learnt when one is younger. Kindergarten aged kids – that's about the right age! Best wishes on your undertaking.

    Ling Tan
    http://www.kidsonboard.net

  8. It can really be frustrating at times especially when you want to ask questions and nobody could understand. But still, Thai people in general are lovely, nice and hospitable, too.

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